• 02Tem

    Planes: Fire & Rescue

    Rated: PG

    Release Date: July 18, 2014

    Planes: Fire & Rescue Pictures

    “Planes: Fire & Rescue” is a new comedy-adventure about second chances, featuring a dynamic crew of elite firefighting aircraft devoted to protecting historic Piston Peak National Park from raging wildfire. When world-famous air racer Dusty (voice of Dane Cook) learns that his engine is damaged and he may never race again, he must shift gears and is launched into the world of aerial firefighting. Dusty joins forces with veteran fire-and-rescue helicopter Blade Ranger (voice of Ed Harris) and his courageous team, including spirited air tanker Dipper (voice of Julie Bowen), heavy-lift helicopter Windlifter (voice of Wes Studi), ex-military transport Cabbie (voice of Captain Dale Dye) and a lively bunch of brave all-terrain vehicles known as The Smokejumpers. Together, the fearless team battles a massive wildfire and Dusty learns what it takes to become a true hero. Directed by Bobs Gannaway (“Secret of the Wings”) and produced by Ferrell Barron (“The Fox and the Hound 2”), “Planes: Fire & Rescue” hits theaters in 3D on July 18, 2014.

  • 02Tem

    Big Hero 6

    Big Hero Pictures

     

     

     

    With all the heart and humor audiences expect from Walt Disney Animation Studios, “Big Hero 6” is an action-packed comedy-adventure about robotics prodigy Hiro Hamada, who learns to harness his genius—thanks to his brilliant brother Tadashi and their like-minded friends: adrenaline junkie Go Go Tamago, neatnik Wasabi, chemistry whiz Honey Lemon and fanboy Fred. When a devastating turn of events catapults them into the midst of a dangerous plot unfolding in the streets of San Fransokyo, Hiro turns to his closest companion—a robot named Baymax—and transforms the group into a band of high-tech heroes determined to solve the mystery. Inspired by the Marvel comics of the same name, and featuring comic-book style action, “Big Hero 6” is directed by Don Hall (“Winnie the Pooh”) and Chris Williams (“Bolt”), and produced by Roy Conli (“Tangled”).

     

  • 24Ağu

    Walt Disney Animation Studios, the studio behind “Tangled” and “Wreck-It Ralph,” presents “Frozen,” a stunning big-screen comedy adventure. Fearless optimist Anna (voice of Kristen Bell) sets off on an epic journey—teaming up with rugged mountain man Kristoff (voice of Jonathan Groff) and his loyal reindeer Sven—to find her sister Elsa (voice of Idina Menzel), whose icy powers have trapped the kingdom of Arendelle in eternal winter. Encountering Everest-like conditions, mystical trolls and a hilarious snowman named Olaf, Anna and Kristoff battle the elements in a race to save the kingdom.

    The film is directed by Chris Buck (“Tarzan,” “Surf’s Up”) and Jennifer Lee (screenwriter, “Wreck-It Ralph”), and produced by Peter Del Vecho (“Winnie the Pooh,” “The Princess and the Frog”). Featuring music from Tony® winner Robert Lopez (“The Book of Mormon,” “Avenue Q”) and Kristen Anderson-Lopez (“In Transit”), “Frozen” is in theaters in 3D on November 27, 2013.

    FROZEN Pictures and Wallpapers

     

     

  • 17Ağu

    From high above the world of “Cars” flies “Planes,”

    Disney’s upcoming animated action-packed comedic adventure starring Dusty, a big-hearted, fast-flying crop duster who dreams of competing in the most exhilarating around-the-world air race in history. There’s only a couple of not-so-small problems — Dusty is not exactly built for racing and he also happens to be afraid of heights.

    Despite his fear and with encouragement from his mentor, a naval aviator named Skipper, Dusty narrowly qualifies for the big competition. Dusty’s sportsmanship and speed begin to rattle the defending champ of the race circuit, Ripslinger, who will stop at nothing to see Dusty fail.

    When disaster strikes during the climax of the final race, Dusty’s courage is put to the ultimate test. With the support of friends old and new, Dusty reaches heights he never dreamed possible.

     

    EARNING THEIR WINGS

    Filmmakers Get Real with “Disney’s Planes

    Klay Hall was into airplanes long before “Disney’s Planes” ever got off the ground. So when executive producer John Lasseter asked the Disneytoon Studios veteran if he’d be interested in directing a feature film set in the skies, it was a no-brainer. “I’ve always loved airplanes,” says Hall. “My dad was in the Navy and his dad was also a pilot. They flew all their lives and passed that love of aviation to me.

    “When I was a kid here in California,” continues Hall, “my dad and I would grab some burgers and Cokes and go to the local runway to watch the planes take off and land. I’d sit there and sketch as he talked about the characteristics of the airplanes. I still have a couple of those drawings. So when this project came up, I was able to really jump into this universe.”

    Disney’s Planes,” which hits theaters on August 9, 2013, is an all-new movie inspired by the world of “Cars,” the Disney•Pixar film that first raced into moviegoers’ hearts in 2006. Produced at Southern California’s Disneytoon Studios, “Disney’s Planes” tells the tale of a crop duster — aptly named Dusty — who’s sure he’s capable of more than taking care of crops.

    Says Hall, “I think people will really relate to ‘Disney’s Planes‘ because it’s a great underdog story. It has a lot of heart and a message we can all use: If we can believe in ourselves, step out of our comfort zones and get past whatever fear is holding us back, we’d be surprised with the results. And that’s exactly what happens to Dusty in this movie. He’s a crop duster who’s never flown above 1,000 feet, but he dreams of being the fastest air racer in the world. He has a lot of obstacles to overcome and needs to dig pretty deep to find the courage to become more than what he was built for.”

    Becoming more than you’re built for is a key theme in the film. Filmmakers first had to understand how airplanes are built and how they operate before they could help Dusty break his predetermined mold. The research they conducted also helped ensure they followed the Lasseter-endorsed philosophy: truth to materials. The principle — as applied to “Disney’s Planes“ — required artists to keep an airplane’s physical structure — its steel frame, its size and weight — in mind while designing and animating the characters. Wings couldn’t be bent, bodies weren’t stretched or squashed and propellers had to move as real propellers would move. Filmmakers found much more subtle ways to convey action and emotion. But it all began with research.

    “We had a lot of fun exploring the world of airplanes,” says Hall. “We’ve been able to experience all kinds of flight — hot air balloons, World War II bombers and different types of jet and civilian aircraft.”

    Several members of the production team took part in field trips — attending air shows, museums, an aircraft carrier and a number of small-town airports — to soak up the atmosphere, bolster their knowledge of airplanes and ensure authenticity in the story. “I was like a kid in a candy store,” says Hall. “We were able to talk to aviation pioneers and fighter pilots, Korean War vets, civilian test pilots. We had special access to the Blue Angels and the Thunderbirds. It’s been amazing.”

    According to Hall, “Disney’s Planes” is set somewhere in the Midwest, so filmmakers visited several areas in the heartland, including:

    • Ohio — Filmmakers visited the National Museum of the United States Air Force, where they saw the historic Memphis Belle in mid-restoration, John F. Kennedy’s Air Force One and a MiG-25 Foxbat fighter jet. They attended the Dayton Air Show, where they met surviving members of the Tuskegee Airmen. They also flew in a 40-year-old Huey helicopter and hung out with the USAF Thunderbirds.
    • North Dakota — Several members of the production team went to the Fargo Air Museum and saw a restored F4U Corsair on display. They talked with a retired U.S. Navy pilot who flew a TBM Avenger torpedo bomber in 1944-1945. The experience proved valuable in the development of Skipper, the seasoned Navy vet that helps train Dusty.
    • Minnesota — Filmmakers hit nine regional airports and air fields, including Leaders Clear Lake Airport, a small air field surrounded by cornfields, which housed a number of old crop dusters and fuel trucks. The location proved to be perfect reference for Propwash Junction’s rural backdrop and weathered buildings. “We found an old fuel truck tucked in some overgrowth next to a cornfield that was actually an inspiration for our fuel truck Chug,” says Hall.

    Members of the production team also visited the USS Carl Vinson. The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier, which boasts a rich history dating back to its launch in 1980, proved to be great reference for a scene in the film that’s set on an aircraft carrier. Producer Traci Balthazor-Flynn joined Hall and a few other members of the team, observing target practice, plus a number of takeoffs, including a Hornet, helicopters and C-2 Cargo planes. “Landing on the aircraft carrier, then riding it into the harbor ranks right up there among the top ten things I’ve done in my life,” says Balthazor-Flynn. “It was fantastic speaking to the crew — we even ran some of the film’s dialogue by a few of the officers.”

    CAN IT FLY?

    Making “Disney’s Planes” fly — literally — called for a unique combination of research, collaboration and a lot of hard work. “We found early on that with tires on the ground, the characters felt real,” says Hall. “But once they took off — once we had to make something turn in a three-dimensional space — it was significantly harder. At first, they looked like toys.”

    Filmmakers called on Jason McKinley (“Red Tails”) to serve as flight specialist for the film. McKinley, creator, producer and director of the “Dogfights” series for the History Channel, specializes in designing flying effects for film and television. “With every flying scene, there’s a giant sky,” says McKinley. “You’re flying around at 300-400 miles an hour and the space you take up is huge. So we wanted to get that massive feeling of space and speed to the audience.”

    McKinley’s first strategy mimics Lasseter’s truth to materials: real size, real speed. “The planes have to be a real size, the set has to be real size and you have to fly the plane at the speed it can actually fly. The human eye is very attuned to motion — we’ve all seen a bird fly or thrown a ball. We’ve built in our brains a library of motions and how those motions are supposed to look. The second you veer from the laws of physics, everybody can tell that it doesn’t look right.”

    Even prior to joining the team behind “Disney’s Planes,” McKinley had done extensive research to understand the core capabilities of individual aircraft — maximum turn rate, maximum roll rate, maximum speed. He applied his knowledge to nearly 800 flight shots in the film — his favorite sequence, however, is Dusty’s entrée into the racing world when he competes in the North American Wings Around the Globe time trials. “This is the moment that he changes,” says McKinley. “He goes from being a crop duster to becoming a legitimate air racer. We wanted to make it a huge moment and we ended up with a 50- to 60-shot sequence.”

    Helping to ensure the authenticity of the flight was Sean Bautista, who became a licensed pilot in high school, went on to fly a variety of aircraft — from Cessnas and Pipers to F4s, F16s and commercial 747s — and has logged several thousand flight hours during the course of his career. “I was able to answer technical questions like ‘How do you up the horse power on a PT6 powered turbo prop crop duster?’”

    Bautista showed the production team how to boost Dusty’s competiveness through specialized maneuvers he might master before entering the racing circuit. He lent his flying expertise to the production when it came to the look of the assorted aircraft and the flight itself. He also helped authenticate some of the dialogue. “We’d go out to lunch and they’d flip on the tape recorder and ask me to talk like a military pilot or traffic controller. These guys don’t talk in normal jargon — it’s sort of shorthand and harder to understand. But incorporating the real thing really makes it feel right.”

    Filmmakers opted to record actual airplanes to bolster the validity of the flight scenes. “We recorded crop dusters for Dusty, some old bi-planes, a twin engine aircraft and even a Navy F-18,” says McKinley, who adds that watching the planes approach at 200 miles per hour during the recording process was an exhilarating experience.

    HIGH HOPES

    As filmmakers explored real planes, they found that many of the details they gathered actually helped drive the story. Given that crop dusters needn’t fly above 1,000 feet, filmmakers theorized that despite his dream of becoming a world famous air racer, Dusty might have some reservations about doing what it takes to achieve it. “He’s not built to fly high — he’s never had to fly high,” says Hall. “So it makes perfect sense that he’d be afraid of heights.”

    Dusty’s fear of heights prompted filmmakers to seek the guidance of a phobia specialist to ensure they characterized the fear appropriately. “We knew if we captured it the right way, we’d connect that much more with that guy in the audience who’s dealing with his own fear — whether it’s of heights or something else entirely,” says Hall.

    “Dusty’s character and condition is relatable because we all suffer fears — some more than others — and we have all experienced struggles in our lives that we cannot easily overcome,” says John Tsilimparis. The licensed psychotherapist, who’s treated people with anxiety disorders for two decades, said acrophobia — the fear of heights — is “marked by symptoms of dizziness, sweating, nausea, dry mouth, shaking, heart palpitations, labored breathing and the inability to speak or think clearly.

    “Dusty’s dilemma is very human and we resonate with his pain,” continues Tsilimparis. “We feel compassion for him and we want him to succeed. We also love the underdog.”

    “We’ve all been the underdog in our own lives,” adds Hall. “We’ve all been Dusty at some point. It’s that familiarity — paired with the authenticity we worked so hard to incorporate at every level — that’ll make audiences root for this guy. And I think that’s one of the best parts of going to the movies.”

     

    • Dane Cook — Dusty Crophopper
    • Stacy Keach — Skipper
    • Brad Garrett — Chug
    • Teri Hatcher — Dottie
    • Cedric the Entertainer — Leadbottom
    • Julia Louis-Dreyfus — Rochelle
    • John Cleese — Bulldog
    • Carlos Alazraqui — El Chupacabra
    • Priyanka Chopra — Ishani
    • Roger Craig Smith — Ripslinger
    • Gabriel Iglesias — Ned / Zed
    • Val Kilmer — Bravo
    • Anthony Edwards — Echo
    • Colin Cowherd — Colin Cowling
    • Sinbad — Roper
    • Oliver Kalkofe — Franz / Fliegenhosen
    • Brent Musburger — Brent Mustangburger

    Disney Planes Pictures and Wallpapers

    Disney Planes Trailer

    Disney Planes Characters

    Dusty

    Dusty is a plane with high hopes — literally. Crop duster by trade, this single-prop plane sees himself soaring alongside his high-flying heroes in an international race. The fact that he’s not really built for competitive racing doesn’t deter him from pursuing his dream—but his fear of heights just might. With a little help from his friends — and a WWII vet with wisdom to spare — Dusty takes off on an adventure of a lifetime, going prop-to-prop with champions while daring to reach heights he never imagined possible.

     

    El Chupacabra

     

    The intensely charming El Chupacabra is a legend in Mexico (just ask him). Powered by his passion for racing (not to mention the elusive Rochelle), this caped Casanova is anything but low-key — his booming voice and charismatic presence are as big as his oversized engine. His cohorts aren’t really sure what is truth and what is delusion when it comes to El Chu, but one thing is beyond doubt: he races with a whole lot of heart and more dramatic flair than is recommended at high altitudes.

     

    Rochelle

    Rochelle is a tough racer and the pride of the Great White North. Always confident and capable, she got her start running mail to small towns in Quebec, picking up home remedies for mechanical maladies along the way. She also developed a knack for fast travel that ultimately inspired her to give air racing a try. Rochelle never looked back (this competitive contender doesn’t need to). She is relentlessly pursued by charmer El Chupacabra, but steadfast Rochelle is much too focused on winning the race to return his affections.

    Ripslinger

    With more wins than he can count and an abundance of fans, Ripslinger is wings-down the biggest name in air racing — and he knows it. But despite sky’s-the-limit funding and state-of-the-art equipment, the world champion still doesn’t play fair — especially when it comes to a small-town plane with zero racing experience. Dusty doesn’t belong in Ripslinger’s sport and his mere presence makes the pro’s fuel boil. And if Dusty’s inexperience doesn’t take him out of the race, Ripslinger’s vast empire includes a couple of underhanded sidekicks to take care of business.

  • 04Tem

     

    Academy Award®-winning Best Animated Feature “Finding Nemo” returns to the big screen for the first time ever in thrilling Disney Digital 3D™.
    In this stunning underwater adventure, with memorable characters, humor and heartfelt emotion, “Finding Nemo” follows the comedic and momentous journey of an overly protective clownfish named Marlin (voice by Albert Brooks) and his son Nemo (voice by Alexander Gould) — who become separated in the Great Barrier Reef when Nemo is unexpectedly taken far from his ocean home and dumped into a fish tank in a dentist’s office. Buoyed by the companionship of Dory (voice by Ellen DeGeneres), a friendly-but-forgetful Pacific regal blue tang, Marlin embarks on a dangerous trek and finds himself the unlikely hero of an epic effort to rescue his son — who hatches a few daring plans of his own to return safely home.

     

    NEMO 3D Pictures and Wallpapers

    NEMO 3D Trailer

  • 21Haz

    The first official trailer has been released for Disney’s upcoming computer-animated film about the world of arcade video game characters, Wreck-It Ralph.

    Oscar-nominated character actor John C. Reilly voices the namesake of Wreck-It Ralph: a hulking baddie in an 8-bit arcade game called Fix-It Felix Jr., whose sole purpose is life is to attempt to destroy buildings, only to be continually thwarted by the game’s eponymous hero (30 Rock‘s Jack McBrayer). One day, Ralph finally decides that he’s had enough and escapes through the power cord – encountering other colorful digital characters like Sergeant Calhoun (Jane Lynch) and Vanellope von Schweetz (Sarah Silverman) on his quest to prove that he can be the good guy in a video game.

    Wreck It Ralph Pictures and Wallpapers

  • 10Haz

    From creative genius Tim Burton (“Alice in Wonderland,” “The Nightmare Before Christmas”) comes Frankenweenie, a heartwarming tale about a boy and his dog. After unexpectedly losing his beloved dog Sparky, young Victor harnesses the power of science to bring his best friend back to life—with just a few minor adjustments. He tries to hide his home-sewn creation, but when Sparky gets out, Victor’s fellow students, teachers and the entire town all learn that getting a new “leash on life” can be monstrous.

    A stop-motion animated film, Frankenweenie, will be filmed in black and white and rendered in 3D, which elevates the classic style to a whole new experience.

    Frankenweenie Pictures and Wallpapers

  • 30Tem

    Since ancient times, stories of epic battles and mystical legends have been passed through the generations across the rugged and mysterious Highlands of Scotland. In ”Brave“, a new tale joins the lore when the courageous Merida (voice of Kelly Macdonald) confronts tradition, destiny and the fiercest of beasts.

    Merida is a skilled archer and impetuous daughter of King Fergus (voice of Billy Connolly) and Queen Elinor (voice of Emma Thompson). Determined to carve her own path in life, Merida defies an age-old custom sacred to the uproarious lords of the land: massive Lord MacGuffin (voice of Kevin McKidd), surly Lord Macintosh (voice of Craig Ferguson) and cantankerous Lord Dingwall (voice of Robbie Coltrane). Merida’s actions inadvertently unleash chaos and fury in the kingdom, and when she turns to an eccentric old Witch (voice of Julie Walters) for help, she is granted an ill-fated wish. The ensuing peril forces Merida to discover the meaning of true bravery in order to undo a beastly curse before it’s too late.

     

    Brave Pictures and wallpapers



  • 31Oca

    Disney presents an astonishing true story bursting with hope, heart, and courage. Diane Lane and John Malkovich lead a celebrated cast in this inspirational motion picture from the producers of Miracle, Invincible and The Rookie.

    Behind every legend lies an impossible dream. Witness the spectacular journey of an incredible horse named Secretariat and the moving story of his unlikely owner, a housewife who risked everything to make him a champion. Out of the gate with never-before-seen bonus features, Secretariat is hours of pulse-pounding entertainment for the whole family!

    PENNY CHENERY TWEEDY (Diane Lane)
    Penny Chenery Tweedy lives in a nice Denver home with her lawyer husband and four children.  But when her mother passes and her father’s health takes a turn for the worse, she turns her life—and her family’s lives—upside down and takes over the Virginia-based horse farm where she was raised. Meadow Stables, once a thriving and well-respected business, is struggling financially, but Penny refuses to sell and instead decides to bet on a promising colt that isn’t even born yet.  Armed with an intimate knowledge of horses, the help of veteran trainer Lucien Laurin and a growing confidence that surfaces at exactly the right time, Penny learns to navigate the male-dominated horse-racing world, ultimately fostering what may be the greatest racehorse of all time.

    PENNY CHENERY TWEEDY (Diane Lane)
    Penny Chenery Tweedy lives in a nice Denver home with her lawyer husband and four children.  But when her mother passes and her father’s health takes a turn for the worse, she turns her life—and her family’s lives—upside down and takes over the Virginia-based horse farm where she was raised. Meadow Stables, once a thriving and well-respected business, is struggling financially, but Penny refuses to sell and instead decides to bet on a promising colt that isn’t even born yet.  Armed with an intimate knowledge of horses, the help of veteran trainer Lucien Laurin and a growing confidence that surfaces at exactly the right time, Penny learns to navigate the male-dominated horse-racing world, ultimately fostering what may be the greatest racehorse of all time.
    SECRETARIAT (several equine actors)
    With Bold Ruler as a father and SomethingRoyal as a mother, this horse’s destiny was clear—at least it was to the two people who helped get him there. Born with his signature red coat and three white socks, the horse was known to those who loved him as Big Red, though he competed under the now famous moniker Secretariat.  Red enjoys eating—a lot—snuggling up to his owner Penny and getting his picture taken, but most of all, he likes to run—fast.  In fact, he was the first horse in 25 years to win the Triple Crown—which consists of the Kentucky Derby, the Preakness Stakes and the Belmont Stakes.  He won the latter by an extraordinary 31 lengths—just to make sure his doubters believed.  Mission accomplished.

    Watch Secretariat Trailer

    Secretariat Pictures

    Tags: , ,

  • 19Eyl

    Description:

    Tinkerbell and the Great Fairy Rescue – Trailer (Walt Disney)

    Release Date: 13 August 2010
    Director: Bradley Raymond
    Starring: Michael Sheen, Mae Whitman, Kristin Chenoweth, Lucy Liu

    Tinker Bell must team up with a rival fairy to keep their existence a secret from humans.

    Tags: , ,

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